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Bright Memory review for Xbox Series X, PC


Platform: Xbox Series X
Also On: PC
Publisher: PLAYISM
Developer: FYQD
Medium: Digital
Players: 1
Online: No
ESRB: M

I remember watching the reveal of the Xbox Series X months ago and being underwhelmed by most of the game reveals. Then there was Bright Memory. Bright Memory is a first-person shooter hack and slash video game developed by Chinese independent developer FYQD Personal Studio. It was also created by a single developer in his spare time.

The Trailer looked great visually and looked and performed as if it was running on a PC. Funny enough, this was a game released on Steam’s Early Access already as I did more research. Having played in on PC prior to the Xbox Series release, may have ruined what could have been an exciting first experience.

The challenge with this, is despite that, once I had my first play through, Bright Memory felt more like a Tech Demo than a true experience I was hoping to get from the trailer that was shown. This is not to discredit the game, but more of take it for what it is. The” experience” will cost around $10 depending on if there is a sale, and you will get about an hour of gameplay, but there is some replay ability with it.

It’s a fast-paced action FPS with some hack and slash elements, but something that grows tiring, is the sheer number of bullets it takes to kill an enemy. It felt like you are revealed to be this bad ass character in the intro scene, gunning down some enemy soldiers, but this overpowered feeling is quickly dumped once you get to the next scene.

Visually the game reminds me of one of my favorite original Xbox titles “Breakdown” which is why I had high hopes. Once you get to the next area, you begin to fight some very strange hybrid beasts in an even stranger world. Since this is a short experience, but I don’t want to spoil anything. The first experience will always be the best and I hope it lasts for some players.

The time with Bright Memory gives you a small variety of action, platforming, puzzle solving and hack and slash mechanics, which if not done right, could spell disaster. It’s too early to tell and judge from this gameplay. Something deep down wants to really enjoy it, but the shortcomings take away from any initial excitement I had for it.

To me, this is the type of demo I would show off the graphics to a friend that would come over and get them hyped for what the console is capable of. In that department, it does a good job. Due to the length being so short, there isn’t much else to discuss other, make sure you understand what you are paying for before purchasing Bright Memory.

PLAYISM provided us with a Bright Memory Xbox Series X code for review purposes.